Before I explain why I wrote this post, I’d like to share with you my story. I was born in England, and by the time I was ten years old I had lost my grandmother and my grandfather to two separate diseases. I’m not going to get into details about either of those health crises, but the experience left me with a strong desire to avoid ever experiencing anything so debilitating. When I was a teenager, I read Ray Kurzweil’s The Age of Spiritual Machines , and I determined that my goal was to live in a world that had been transformed into a singularity-like state by the 2020s. I set a deadline for myself, and that deadline became my life. I have no regrets.

During the second half of the 19th century, Western societies began to systematically kill the people they deemed to be the most undesirable—whether they were born into poverty, under a system that treated them as second-class citizens, or simply because they wanted to live their own lives. It was a process of genocide, and it happened all over the world—from the United States to the Philippines, Rwanda to China. Most people know this history as the “Indian Wars” in the United States, but it’s also called the “Scramble for Africa”, and has been referred to as “the trans-Atlantic slave trade” in some circles. It’s a history that too few of us

As climate change creates more extreme weather events, many people are considering how they can reduce the risk of harm to themselves and their families. The longer-term question of how to integrate a low-carbon future into the daily lives of individuals and society is increasingly important, as technological innovations can help make adaptation easier and more cost effective.. Read more about long game and let us know what you think.

Daniel Hayes was a dedicated runner who made exercise a way of life. So when his health took a turn for the worst and he was put on medications that slowed his metabolism, none of his regular weight-loss strategies worked. He’s now 35 pounds lighter and an inspiration to his little kid.

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When you’re a marathon runner, you expect your body to follow your commands.

You increase the number of miles you run each week, and your body reacts by improving your fitness and endurance.

When you increase your protein and vegetable intake, your body responds by gaining muscle and losing fat.

Daniel Hayes’ simple cause-and-effect, master-and-servant relationship with his body abruptly flipped in 2008, when he was 38 years old.

Daniel Hayes’ simple cause-and-effect, master-and-servant relationship with his body abruptly flipped in 2008, when he was 38 years old.

Daniel Hayes’ simple cause-and-effect, master-and-servant relationship with his body abruptly flipped in 2008, when he was 38 years old.

Daniel Hayes’ simple cause-and-effect, master-and-servant relationship with his body abruptly flipped in 2008, when he was 38 years old.

Daniel Hayes’ simple cause-and-effect, master-and-servant relationship with his body abruptly flipped in 2008, when he was 38 years old.

“Unfortunately, I was placed on a high dosage of statins and a beta-blocker, which significantly slowed down my metabolism,” Daniel explains.

“Just from the medications alone, I gained approximately 30 pounds over the following 5 or 6 years.”

Daniel found that his tried-and-true methods for keeping a fit physique no longer worked, despite his years of expertise. They just couldn’t compete with his new health circumstances.

Furthermore, the amount of time he had to spend to developing a successful diet and exercise plan was more restricted than ever.

For starters, Daniel was spending a lot of time caring for his mother, who was suffering from dementia and died away in 2013.

Meanwhile, Daniel’s business was taken out, and he was coping with the stress and obligations that come with knowing your career is in jeopardy.

There was, however, a silver lining: the birth of his first son. However, as every new parent quickly learns, having a young kid reduces the amount of time you have to devote to diet and exercise.

Daniel-Hayes-Making-peace-with-the-long-game

Daniel at his heaviest, owing to a sluggish metabolism and a plethora of conflicting demands.

Daniel continued to exercise, but he no longer felt like the fit and healthy man he used to be.

By 2015, Daniel had reached a new high weight of 238, and it was obvious that he wanted to try something different. That ship had sailed, so he couldn’t anticipate a fast repair.

“I simply looked myself in the eyes and said myself, ‘I’ve got to do something about this.’ I need to maintain my health. Particularly for my wife and kid.’

This is where coaching comes in.

Daniel knew he’d need some assistance to reduce weight in a manner that fit with his medicines, medical history, and hectic lifestyle.

So he went online to look at nutrition coaching possibilities, and he liked what he read about PN’s habit-based approach.

He’d have to “meet himself where he was” and concentrate on long-term solutions rather than quick fixes.

As a result, he delved into the PN program’s routines and progressively altered his eating habits.

One of the most significant changes? Slowly eating until you’re 80% full is a lifetime “anchor” habit that helps you reconnect with your metabolism and hunger signals.

Daniel realized he’d become used to feeling full after meals.

“I believe my behaviors originated from my parents growing up during the depression,” Daniel says. “You have to do everything on your to-do list. Nothing could be thrown away. It was difficult for me to break free from that mentality since I had grown up with it.”

Daniel gained muscular mass (and strength) and shed approximately 12 pounds of body fat after a year on the regimen. In addition, through doing new things, he learnt to see movement and exercise as a pleasure rather than a chore.

But what was the most significant change after that first year? The breadth of his self-awareness.

Slowing your metabolism and having deep-seated clean-your-plate habits aren’t going to go away quickly. So, six months after completing the program, Daniel discovered that he missed having a nutrition coach for support and accountability.

Daniel was well aware that he needed to practice more healthy habits and that he needed to drop more weight. He was on a longer trip than he’d anticipated, but that was OK with him.

Daniel felt more grounded than ever towards the end of his second year and couldn’t resist the temptation to join up for a third. He has dropped almost 35 pounds so far.

1626005926_785_Daniel-Hayes-Making-peace-with-the-long-game

Several months into his PN adventure, Daniel prepares for a workout.

Playing the long game is a tactic Daniel has adopted with great success.

Sustainable food and exercise habits that make sense for complex health and life situations, like marathon training, typically take time and repetition to establish.

“It takes a long time to get into the condition you’re in, and it’ll take a long time to come out of it,” Daniel adds. “It isn’t going to happen in a day.”

Daniel now knows he can depend on his newly established healthy habits even when life throws him its typical challenges—these days, it’s typically in the shape of a hectic schedule or needing to travel for business.

“At the very least, I know I can always practice eating slowly and until I’m fully satisfied. I can typically get in a few short bodyweight workouts as well. Even when life becomes hectic, those old habits keep me on track.”

Another benefit of playing the long game is that you have the resilience to recognize that your health and weight will be able to absorb life’s unavoidable diet and fitness “mistakes.”

Daniel advises, “Be patient.” “Be patient with yourself as well as with the process. You take things one day at a time. This is how you get to your goal: tiny, incremental changes.”

1626005927_20_Daniel-Hayes-Making-peace-with-the-long-game

“Every now and again, you’ll eat or drink too much. Rather of being so harsh on yourself, you might just respond, “You know what? Life is unpredictable. ‘Tomorrow is a new day,’ says the narrator.

Daniel also understands that his new long-term behaviors will help him be a better role model for his kid.

Daniel had envisioned taking up martial arts at the start of his first year of PN Coaching, as a way of going back to being the healthy person he’d previously been… to keep up with his 4-year-old kid, who has been a karate fan since he was four.

Daniel knew he’d “made it” when he realized he’d gained enough confidence to begin training in Brazilian jiu-jitsu.

1626005929_719_Daniel-Hayes-Making-peace-with-the-long-game

After a jiu jitsu match with his little son, Daniel.

 

“Now that my kid sees me doing martial arts, he wants to try it as well. That’s something I’m proud of.”

The prospect of finding a good sparring partner excites Daniel’s kid the most.

“He’s tiny, but I’m his kicking bag,” Daniel jokes. He believes I’m unbreakable.”

Do you want to be the healthiest, fittest, and strongest version of yourself?

Most people are aware that getting enough exercise, eating properly, sleeping well, and managing stress are all essential for looking and feeling better. However, they need assistance in putting that information into practice in the context of their hectic, often stressful lives.

Over the last 15 years, we’ve utilized the Coaching approach to assist over 100,000 customers lose weight, gain strength, and improve their health… over the long haul… no matter what obstacles they face.

It’s also why, via our Level 1 and Level 2 Certification programs, we educate health, fitness, and wellness professionals how to coach their own clients through similar difficulties.

Interested in becoming a coach? Join the presale list to save up to 54% and get a seat 24 hours before the general public.

On Wednesday, July 14th, 2021, we will be accepting applications for our upcoming Coaching.

If you’re interested in learning more about coaching, I recommend signing up for our presale list below. Being on the list provides you with two distinct benefits.

  • If you’re interested in learning more about coaching, I recommend signing up for our presale list below. Being on the list provides you with two distinct benefits.
  • If you’re interested in learning more about coaching, I recommend signing up for our presale list below. Being on the list provides you with two distinct benefits.

If you’re interested in learning more about coaching, I recommend signing up for our presale list below. Being on the list provides you with two distinct benefits.

[Note: If you currently have your health and fitness under control but want to assist others, look into our Level 1 Certification program.]

 

This article broadly covered the following related topics:

  • long game
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  • poncho game review
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  • lon game
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